Occult Trajectories: Magic and modernity

The complexities of Aleister Crowley’s magical relationship with anhalonium lewinii

Aleister Crowley (1875 – 1947) had a complex relationship with drugs. Although his uses and abuses of drugs are now legendary, even notorious, his relationship with drugs was not purely recreational or simply hedonist. On the contrary, he thought himself a scientific experimenter of sorts. He closely analyzed the effects that drugs had upon his consciousness and developed theories about the relationship between chemically-induced alterations of consciousness and the ecstatic results of meditative and magical practices.1
Crowley’s formal magical education began in 1898, when he was initiated into the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.2
 His formal training in the magical uses of drugs, however, began a year later under the tutelage of Allan Bennett (1872 – 1923).3
 
The Golden Dawn was an initiatory secret society composed of men and women founded in 1888. Initiates were instructed in the theory and practice of ceremonial magic as they advanced through the graded degrees of the Golden Dawn initiatory system. The syncretic ritual theory of the Golden Dawn drew on an eclectic range of sources, including Graeco-Egyptian Magical Papyri, Medieval grimoires, Renaissance and Elizabethan manuscripts, the rituals of Freemasonry, and modern works of occultism. Bennett was a senior magician in the Order and a close friend of its leader. He also trained and worked as an analytic chemist and possessed an extensive collection of drugs to treat his own asthma.4

He brought this with him when he moved in with Crowley and began teaching him ceremonial magic. Thus, in the privacy of Crowley’s Chancery Lane apartment, these two intrepid magicians experimented with every form of evocatory and invocatory magical practice they knew of, their consciousnesses ritually exalted and chemically augmented by liberal doses of cocaine, morphine, and chloroform as the need arose. In the following decades, Crowley conducted many operations of ritual magic enhanced by the use of drugs. His diaries record decades of these magical experiments. Posthumous analyses of these diaries have revealed many details of his personal ceremonial practices. Some of this information was veiled in the accounts of these magical escapades which he published during his lifetime, particularly information relating to sex and drugs.

Some information was omitted entirely from the public version of events. His use of the drug Anhalonium Lewinii is a striking example of such a case. This paper will show that Crowley was very guarded about his own personal use of anhalonium, especially for magical purposes. Accordingly, one cannot construct a truly accurate picture of Crowleys magical relationship with anhalonium solely from source material he published while living.

To construct a thorough picture, Crowley’s public statements must be contextualized by additional evidence sourced from private diaries or personal correspondences, although even the evidence of diary entries shall be shown to have its own limitations. The picture which thereby emerges reveals a Crowley who had a considerably more involved and complex magical relationship with anhalonium than his own public narrative would suggest.

 Anhalonium lewinii is a now-defunct name for peyote (Lophophora williamsii).5
Peyote  is a small, blue-green spineless cactus which grows in dry regions of Mexico and some parts of the United States. It contains a number of psychoactive alkaloids including mescaline, its primary visionary component. Mescaline is considered one of the so-called ‘classical psychedelics’, along with LSD, DMT, and psilocybin.6
 
It typically causes long-lasting brilliantly colorful and powerfully intense kaleidoscopic visions, and sometimes even ‘religious’ ecstasy. Peyote has a long history of indigenous ceremonial and religious usage in North America. It has functions both as a religious sacrament and as a healing medicine, often simultaneously. Although traditions vary according to local customs, indigenous peyote use is typically a highly ritualized affair. Rituals tend to be group happenings, normally led by a shaman or medicine-man, in which rhythmic drums and rattlers are played and traditional songs are sung. (Peyote: The Divine Cactus.)7
Scientific research into peyote and its psycho-activity began at the end of the nineteenth century. In 1888, German pharmacologist Louis Lewin (1850 – 1929) published the first scientific paper on the chemistry of peyote.8
 Lewin’s source for dried peyote was the Parke-Davis pharmaceutical company in Detroit. Arthur Heffter (1859 – 1925), another German pharmacologist and a rival of Lewin’s, also conducted experiments with peyote obtained from Parke-Davis.9
 

Heffter self-experimented with the compounds he managed to isolate from the cactus. He discovered its primary psychoactive alkaloid and named it ‘mescaline’. Thus, Heffter became the first human to ingest pure mescaline. American novelist, physician, and ‘father of neurology’ Silas Weir Mitchell (1829 – 1914) published the first description of peyote intoxication in 1897.10

 Seemingly inspired by Mitchell, British sexologist Havelock Ellis (1859 – 1939) experimented with peyote buttons that same year and became the first Westerner to take a full dose of mescaline more than once. He later published an account of his visions entitled Mescal: A New Artificial Paradise.11
 
The most significant achievement in the chemistry of peyote in the first half of the twentieth century comes from the work of Austrian chemist Ernst Späth (1886 – 1946), who became the first chemist to synthesize mescaline in 1919.12
The late 1920s saw the publication of two works devoted to the subject by German researchers. Neurologist and psychiatrist Kurt Beringer (1893 – 1949), a student of Lewin’s who conducted hundreds of human trials with peyote, published Der  Meskalrausche in 1927 and the following year psychologist Heinrich Kluver (1897 – 1979) published Mescal, the Divine Plant and Its Psychological Effects.13

 After Spath synthesized mescaline, he carried on into the late-30s with his research. Between 1918 and 1939, he and his colleagues published nineteen papers on the chemistry of peyote. Psychedelic research soon developed into a field of its own in the wake of discovery of the psychoactive effects of LSD by Albert Hofmann (1906 – 2008) in 1943.14

 Shortly after that scientific studies of peyote and mescaline became subsumed within the broader domain of this new domain of research.Peyote use outside its native habitat was largely unheard of in the first half of the twentieth century.
One notable exception is the impromptu ‘ceremony’ hosted at the Greenwich Village apartment of Mabel Dodge Luha (1879 – 1962) in 1914. Dodge was a wealthy American patroness of the arts. She was persuaded to host the ‘ceremony’ by Mark Raymond Harrington (1882 – 1971), the American archaeologist. Harrington had discovered peyote while researching the Kiowa tribe in Oklahoma. It was not until the 1950s that knowledge of mescaline and its effects reached a large audience of educated and curious Westerners. 

Under the supervision of Humphry Osmond (1917 – 2004), a psychiatrist conducting research into psychedelics and schizophrenia, English novelist Aldous Huxley (1894 – 1963) experimented with mescaline in 1953. The following year, Huxley published an account of his experiences entitled ‘The Doors of Perception’.15

 

This enormously influential work is now considered a classic of psychedelic literature. Many writers and other artists, inspired by Huxley, went on to experiment with peyote and mescaline themselves including Allen Ginsberg (1926 – 1997), Alan Watts (1915 – 1973), and William S. Burroughs (1914 – 1997).

According to diary fragments from the time, Crowley’s relationship with anhalonium lewinii began in 1907.16

 The actual substance was a tincture or liquid extract of peyote. An entry for Tuesday March 12th of that year records that he began experimenting with drops of the tincture in water. Since the minimum dosage stated on the bottle was two drops, Crowley chose to begin carefully at 10pm with one drop in warm water. He proceed to increase the dosage over time, and recorded its effects or lack thereof. By 11:50pm Crowley had taken 10 drops, the maximum dosage according to the label, so he stopped. His midnight entry states:
[Concentration] not interfered with by drug. Maybe one gets occasional brilliant pictures with eyes shut; but it is not enough to record. I could get as good with plain expectation. Am apparently very sleep. Pupils certainly not dilated. Eyes bloodshot, which is no surprise, after staring hard at the electric globe for over 10 minutes.
Crowley experimented with anhalonium again on March 15th when he took 16 drops, this time in cold water, between 9:15pm and 11:30pm. His record states: ‘No result; but felt as if near something. Also slight stomach discomfort’. These diary entries reveal a lot about Crowley’s personal technique of analyzing drug effects. He begins tentatively and deliberately with half the stated minimum dose, then proceeds to gradually increase the dosage. It seems that during his earlier experiments at least, Crowley halted at or around the maximum stated dosage, only surpassing it if the effects remained imperceptible. He pays particular attention to the phenomenological effects of the drug, in contrast to the phenomenology of everyday consciousness. For instance, he records that his concentration remains unaffected, while the minor visual effects he experienced were not particularly noteworthy and could be achieved without the use of the drug. He also carefully notes the physiological effects he experienced.It is unclear from whom Crowley received his tincture of anhalonium.
The most likely source is the distinguished pharmacist, Edward Whineray (1861 – 1924), who ran a chemist shop on Stafford Street in London.17

 When the Dangerous Drugs Act 1920 was introduced in the United Kingdom, the sale of drugs like morphine, heroin, and cocaine became severely restricted by legislation and was penalized heavily. At the beginning of the twentieth century however, these and many other drugs were stocked by pharmacies and were even available ‘over-the-counter’ without a prescription. Whineray’s shop was no exception. In fact, Whineray was the supplier of intoxicants to a large portion of London’s wealthy, including many society ladies who had acquired the taste for morphine.18

 He was also an occasional contributor to Crowley’s journal of occultism

The Equinox. Whineray penned a scientific article examining the history and effects of hashish, entitled ‘The Pharmacy of Hashish,’ included in the very first issue of the journal published in 1909. 19 He later contributed a review of a book about the history of pharmacy. 20

Crowley visited Whineray regularly for year to procure various magical necessities, such as ingredients for perfumes and incenses, as well as hashish. 21
 
Presumably Whineray also supplied Crowley with anhalonium. In 1908, Crowley wrote The Drug,a short story published in The Idler Magazineof January 1909. 22
 
The narrator describes a visit to the house of a ‘quiet friend. ’To the narrator’s surprise, he discovers that his friend operates a secret laboratory where, by various occult and alchemical means, he creates a mysterious ‘liquor’ which he calls ‘the drug that giveth strange vision.’ Upon drinking the mysterious liquid, the narrator is plunged into an intensely powerful visionary and transformative experience, during which he is regularly assaulted by the question ‘Am I insane?’
The presumably semi-autobiographical experience described in ‘The Drug’ would not look out of place alongside the accounts of psychedelic experiences written in the 1960s. It is therefore extremely likely that the drug which inspired ‘The Drug’ is anhalonium.23
 It seems then that at some point, between his first March 1907 experiments and the writing of The Drug, Crowley had discovered a dosage that produced the notably visionary power of anhalonium. The visionary potential of anhalonium
 is further attested to in Liber 777  which was published anonymously the same year as ‘The Drug’. 24.
Liber 777  is a reference work of practical ceremonial magic which contains page after page of magical correspondences tabulated according to the qabalistic framework of the Golden Dawn. Anhalonium appears in the columns ‘Plants, Real and Imaginary’ and ‘Vegetable Drugs.’ 25 Crowleys annotations to these entries states that anhalonium has two

 

 

 

 

 

Footnotes:

1See, for example, his ‘The Herb Dangerous (Part II): The Psychology of Hashish’ in The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism, 1.2 (1909), 31-89.2For more details, see: Robert A. Gilbert, ‘Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn’, in Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism, ed. by Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden: Brill, 2006), pp. 544-550.3For more on Bennett, see: Richard Kaczynski,
Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley
 (California: North Atlantic Books, 2010), pp. 61-65.4Aleister Crowley,
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autohagiography ed. by John Symonds and Kenneth Grant (London: Penguin, 1979), p. 180.
5Since 1854, peyote has had a number of botanical classifications, including
anhalonium lewinii. Sometimes peyote is called ‘mescal’, ‘mescal bean’, or ‘mescal button’. These names more properly refer to Sophora secundiflora, a quite poisonous red bean which grows in the same regions of North America as peyote and which was used ritually before the wide adoption of peyote. Crowley never uses the name lophophora williamsii to refer to peyote, which suggests that he did not keep up to date with the latest scientific and ethnobotanical literature on the subject. He mostly uses the name anhalonium lewinii
, although rarely to refer to the cactus itself. When Crowley writes about using
anhalonium, he typically means ingesting drops of a tincture prepared from a peyote extraction. When he refers to the cactus itself, he sometimes uses the technically inaccurate names ‘mescal’ and ‘mescal buttons’.6For a concise introduction to the classical psychedelics, see: Rick Strassman, ‘The Psychedelics: Overview of a Controversial Drug Type’, in Inner Paths to Outer Space (Vermont: Park Street Press, 2008), pp. 7-32.7For a full analysis of ritual elements sorted according to tribe, see: Omer C. Stewart and David F. Aberle,
Peyotism in the West  (Utah: University of Utah Press, 1984), pp. 20-29 and pp. 105-113.8Edward F. Anderson, Peyote: The Divine Cactus (Arizona: University of Arizona Press, 1996), p. 138.9Graham Harvey,
Shamanism: A Reader  (London: Routledge, 2003), p. 428
10Ibid.11Printed in
The Contemporary Review
 of January 1898.12Anderson,
Peyote: The Divine Cactus
, p. 138.13Harvey,
Shamanism: A Reader 
, p. 429.14For Hofmann’s own account, see: Albert Hofmann,
 LSD: My Problem Child 
, trans. by Jonathan Ott (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, Inc., 1983).15Aldous Huxley,
The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell
 (London: Vintage Books, 2004).
6Aleister Crowley, ‘1907 Diary Fragment’, unpublished diary fragment, in
 Aleister’s Page of Illumination
<http://www.thelema.ca/156/People/Crowley/1907Crowley%20diary%20fragment%20.html> [Last accessed: 29th
May 2015].17Crowley,
Confessions p. 546.
18Kaczynski,
Perdurabo
, p. 163-164. Martin Booth,
Cannabis: A History
 (New York: Picador, 2004), p. 156-159.19See: ‘The Herb Dangerous (Part I): The Pharmacy of Hashish’ in
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.1 (1909), pp. 231-255.20See:
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.6 (1911), p. 170.21Crowley,
Confessions
, p. 546.22Republish as: Aleister Crowley, ‘The Drug’, in
The Drug and Other Stories
 (Hertfordshire: Wordsworth Editions Limited, 2010), pp. 77-83.23Hashish is also a possible inspiration for ‘The Drug’, but this is less likely because the description of the experience bears more similarity to the phenomenological effects of
anhalonium
.24See:
 Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum  Hieroglyphicum Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ
, in
777 and Other Qabalistic Writings of Aleister Crowley
, ed. by Israel Regardie (San Francisco: Red Wheel/Weiser, 1986).25Crowley,
 Liber 777 
, p. 10 and p. 13.
26Ibid., p. 97 and p. 122.27See:
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.9 (1913), pp. 17-46.28In the parlance of our own time: ‘sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll’.29Ibid., p. 37.30Alex Owen,
The Place of Enchantment: British Occultism and the Culture of the Modern
 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004), p. 151.31Remember that
anhalonium
 is not explicitly named in ‘The Drug’ and Crowley initially published
 Liber 777
anonymously. Similarly, even if the ‘elixir’ in Energized Enthusiasm refers to
anhalonium
, it is not explicit.32See:
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 3.1 (1919)
33Ibid., p. 16.34Kaczyinski,
Perdurabo
, p. 609.35Ibid., p. 211.36Aleister Crowley, Victor B. Neuburg and Mary Desti,
The Vision & the Voice with Commentary and Other Papers: The Collected Diaries of Aleister Crowley 1909-1914 E.V.
 (Boston, MA: Red Wheel/Weiser, 1998), p. 259.
37Kaczynski,
Perdurabo
, p. 218-219.38Ibid., pp. 258-259 and p. 315.39It also appears in the context of a discussion about the possibility of ‘some pharmaceutical, electrical or surgical method of inducing Samadhi’ and creating ‘genius as simply as we do other kinds of specific excitement’.
 Anhalonium
 is mentioned only in passing as causing ‘hallucinations of colour’; no explicit reference is made to it as a possible candidate ‘pharmaceutical method’ of inducing Samadhi. Crowley,
Confessions
, p. 386.40Ibid., p. 768.
41See chapter 93 in Aleister Crowley,
 Liber Aleph: The Book of Wisdom or Folly
 (San Francisco: Level Press, 1974).42Aleister Crowley,
 Little Essays Toward Truth
 (Scottsdale, AZ: New Falcon Publications, 1991), p. 38.43See:
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.4 (1910), p. 117.44See:
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.7 (1910).
 Liber Nu
, pp. 13-20, and
 Liber Had 
, pp. 85-91.
45AL II: 22. Aleister Crowley,
The Book of the Law:
Liber AL vel Legis
 – Centennial Edition
(San Francisco: Red Wheel/Weiser, 2004), p. 41.46
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
, 1.4 (1910), p. 395.47The Ab-ul-Diz working resulted in the production of the first two parts of
 Book 4
. As a result of the Amalantrah working, various magical names with initiatory significance were ‘revealed’ to Crowley.
48Crowley,
The Vision and the Voice with Commentary and Other Papers
, p. 323.49Ibid., p. 374.50John Symonds,
The Magic of Aleister Crowley
 (London: Frederick Muller Ltd, 1958), p. 119.
51Egil Asprem,
 Arguing with Angels: Enochian Magic & Modern Occulture
 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012), pp. 85-101.
52Symonds,
The Magic of Aleister Crowley
, p. 119.
53Incidentally,
The Vision and the Voice
operation involves all three of these elements.
Bibliography
Primary Sources:
Crowley, Aleister, ‘1907 Diary Fragment’, unpublished, in
 Aleister’s Page of Illumination
<http://www.thelema.ca/156/People/Crowley/1907Crowley%20diary%20fragment%20.html> [Last accessed: 29
th
 May 2015]___,
 Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicum Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ
, in
777 and Other Qabalistic Writings of Aleister Crowley
, ed. by Israel Regardie (San Francisco: Red Wheel/Weiser, 1986)___,
 Liber Aleph: The Book of Wisdom or Folly
 (San Francisco: Level Press, 1974)___,
 Little Essays Toward Truth
 (Scottsdale, AZ: New Falcon Publications, 1991)___,
 Magick: Liber ABA, Book 4, Parts I-IV 
, with Mary Desti and Leila Waddell, 2
nd
 rev. edn, ed. by Hymenaeus Beta [William Breeze] (San Francisco, CA: Weiser, 2010)___,
The Book of the Law:
Liber AL vel Legis
 – Centennial Edition
(San Francisco: Red Wheel/Weiser, 2004)___,
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autohagiography
, ed. by John Symonds and Kenneth Grant (London: Penguin, 1979)___, ‘The Drug’, in
The Drug and Other Stories
 (Hertfordshire: Wordsworth Editions Limited, 2010), pp. 77-83___,
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
,
 
1.1-10 (London: 1909 – 1913)___,
The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism
,
 
3.1 (London: 1919)___, Victor B. Neuburg and Mary Desti,
The Vision & the Voice with Commentary and Other Papers: The Collected Diaries of Aleister Crowley 1909-1914 E.V.
 (Boston, MA: Red Wheel/Weiser, 1998)
Secondary Sources:
Anderson, Edward F.,
Peyote: The Divine Cactus
 (Arizona: University of Arizona Press, 1996)Asprem, Egil,
 Arguing with Angels: Enochian Magic & Modern Occulture
 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2012)___, ‘Magic Naturalized? Negotiating Science and Occult Experience in Aleister Crowley’s Scientific Illuminism’, in Aries: Journal for the Study of Western Esotericism
, 8.2 (2008), 139- Occult Trajectories: Magic and modernityPatrick Everitt – patrick.everitt@student.uva.nl Co-ordinator: Dr. Marco Pasi
Crowley and Anhalonium
 
Page 15 of 17 166Booth, Martin, A Magick Life: A Biography of Aleister Crowley
 (London: Hodder and Staughton, 2001)___,
Cannabis: A History (New York: Picador, 2004)Churton, Tobias,
 Aleister Crowley The Biography: Spiritual Revolutionary, Romantic Explorer, Occult Master – And Spy (London: Watkins Publishing, 2012)Gilbert, Robert A., ‘Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn’, in Dictionary of Gnosis and Western  Esotericism, ed. by Wouter J. Hanegraaff (Leiden: Brill, 2006), pp. 544-550Harvey, Graham,
Shamanism: A Reader   (London: Routledge, 2003)Hofmann, Albert,
 LSD: My Problem Child , trans. by Jonathan Ott (Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, Inc., 1983)Huxley, Aldous,
The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell
 (London: Vintage Books, 2004)Kaczynski, Richard,
Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley
 (California: North Atlantic Books, 2010)King, Francis,
The Magical World of Aleister Crowley
 (London: Arrow Books, 1977)LaBarre, Weston,
The Peyote Cult , 4th (Connecticut: Archon Books, 1975)Mistlberger, P. T.,
The Three Dangerous Magic: Osho, Gurdjieff, Crowley
 (Hampshire: O-Books, 2010)Owen, Alex,
The Place of Enchantment: British Occultism and the Culture of the Modern
 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004)Partridge, Christopher,
The Re-Enchantment of the West: Alternative Spiritualities, Sacralization, Popular Culture and Occulture – Volume II 
 (London: T&T Clark International, 2005)Regardie, Israel, ‘Roll Away the Stone: An Introduction to Aleister Crowley’s essays on the Psychology of Hashish’, in
 Roll Away the Stone
 (Minnesota: Llewellyn Publications, 1968), pp. 3 – 65 Slotkin, J. S.,
The Peyote Religion: A Study in Indian-White Relations
 (Illinois: The Free Press, 1965)Spence, Richard B.,
Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult 
 (Port Townsend, WA: Feral House, 2008)Stewart, Omer C., and David F. Aberle,
Peyotism in the West 
 (Utah: University of Utah Press, 1984)Strassman, Rick, ‘The Psychedelics: Overview of a Controversial Drug Type’, in
 Inner Paths to Occult Trajectories: Magic and modernityPatrick Everitt – patrick.everitt@student.uva.nl Co-ordinator: Dr. Marco Pasi
Crowley and Anhalonium
 
Page 16 of 17
Outer Space
 (Vermont: Park Street Press, 2008), pp. 7-32Suster, Gerald,
The Life, Work and Influence of Aleister Crowley
 (York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1990)Sutin, Lawrence,
 Do What Thou Wilt: A Life of Aleister Crowley
 (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000)Symonds, John,
The Great Beast: The Life and Magick of Aleister Crowley
 (St Albans: Granada Publishing Limited)___,
The Magic of Aleister Crowley
 (London: Frederick Muller Ltd, 1958).

**

 

 

Resources\Related:

The Drug

AeonLux: Aleister Crowley’s – Anhalonium Lewinii

Luminist Archives: Aleister Crowley: The Psychology of Hashish

The Equinox: The Review of Scientific Illuminism Archives

Aleister Crowley – Thelema Canada

Books in Category Thelema Magick – Dark Books.org

Works of Aleister Crowley publication data – Encyclopedia Thelemica

Anhalonium lewinii | National Center for Homeopathy

Anhalonium Lewinii – COMPLETE information about Anhalonium …

A Modern Herbal | Mescal Buttons – Botanical.com

Anhalonium lewinii | definition of Anhalonium lewinii by Medical …

Mystic Chemist, Part 2: Researchers Discover LSD – Reality Sandwich

MAPS – The Second Psychedelic Revolution, Part Five: A Short …

Peyote

vanni santoni

Heads News on Twitter: “A new collection of Allen Ginsberg lectures is …

MagiCactus.com – Lophophora Williamsii – Peyote

Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) cactus plants for sale | CactusPlaza.com

Peyote (Lophophora williamsii) cactus

Science and Religion | Aleister Crowley 2012

“Handcrafted edition of Aleister Crowley’s short story “The Drug.

Aleister Crowley – The Drug – 100th Monkey Press

Aleister Crowley and Western Esotericism

Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult

Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley in the Desert – The University of Chicago Press

The Lonely Garden • View topic – ALEISTER CROWLEY

The_Cactus_and_the_Beast_Investigating_t – OTO Ireland

Heads News

Writings On Psychedelics and The Visionary Experience by …

Parke-Davis

The_Cactus_and_the_Beast_Investigating_t – OTO Ireland

Nature’s Pharmacopeia: A World of Medicinal Plants

Psychedelic Drug Treatments: Assisting the Therapeutic Process

Parke-Davis – Sex More Links

Post navigation

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s